Hi everyone. I'm a graduate student at Florida State, and I'm collecting data for an article I'm writing for my Editing & Publishing class. If you would take a few minutes to fill out the brief survey below, I would greatly appreciate it. As part of my assignment, I will post my article and findings here on Book Blogs once it's done.

***SURVEY***

1) Do you own an eBook Reader/Kindle/iPad?

2a) In general, do you prefer reading print books or eBooks?

2b) If you prefer print, what do you find inconvenient about eBooks/eReaders?

3) Do you or have you read literary journals on your eBook Reader?

4a) How much would you pay for a PRINT literary journal that interested you (Literary journals generally cost between $10 to $20)?

4b) How much would you pay for an E-BOOK version of that same journal?

4c) If both print and eBook were the same price, which would you buy?

5) If you generally prefer PRINT versions, what changes would the eBook versions need to undergo in order to attract you (i.e. lower price, eBook-only enhancements, bonus materials, etc.)?

 

***END SURVEY***

 

In case you're wondering how this came up:

A few weeks ago I attended a conference in Binghamton, NY, and one of the panel sessions included a discussion with an editor from the literary journal Stone Canoe. The representative had several questions for the audience concerning e-books. He asked how much readers would be willing to pay for an e-book version of the journal and how many audience members owned e-book readers. Audience members responded that they wouldn't pay the same price as the print version. Also, only two audience members (in a room of fifteen) claimed to own an e-book reader. The audience argued that e-readers take away from the magic of the printed page and that iPads put strain on a reader’s eyes.

For my article I want to explore the marketability of literary e-journals and report on whether they’re best for journals like Stone Canoe at this time.

Thank you for your time,

- Brandon

Tags: Journals, Kindle, Literary, ebooks, iPad

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Need some replies

1) Do you own an eBook Reader/Kindle/iPad?
I own a Kindle Touch.

2a) In general, do you prefer reading print books or eBooks?
I prefer reading ebooks on my Kindle Touch.

2b) If you prefer print, what do you find inconvenient about eBooks/eReaders?
N/A

3) Do you or have you read literary journals on your eBook Reader?
No.

4a) How much would you pay for a PRINT literary journal that interested you (Literary journals generally cost between $10 to $20)?
I don't read literary journals, so I can't estimate a price I would pay.

4b) How much would you pay for an E-BOOK version of that same journal?
Same answer as question 4a.

4c) If both print and eBook were the same price, which would you buy?
I would buy the ebook. But I don't like spending a lot on ebooks, and I'm not happy when the print book is close to the same price as the ebook. If I can get the print book for cheaper than the ebook, I will get the print book, even though I prefer ebooks.

5) If you generally prefer PRINT versions, what changes would the eBook versions need to undergo in order to attract you (i.e. lower price, eBook-only enhancements, bonus materials, etc.)?
N/A

1. I own a Kindle Fire.

2. ebooks

3. No

4a. $10

4b. $9.99 or less

4c. ebooks

 

 

1. An iPad  yes

2.a) Print, although I did find reading a graphic novel on the iPad felt enhanced by the backlit screen, heavy coloured visuals felt highly effective on the iPad.

b) I still find a paperback is lighter and more portable than the iPad and more durable. I am not keen on the backlit screen of the iPad and laptop.  I found trying to read on screen in a moving vehicle made me motion sick but that does not happen if I am reading a paperback, not sure why that should happen but it does.

3. I have read journals on the iPad or on my laptop, I have also accessed and read individual articles on those devices but I have not purchased copies but have accessed them via an academic library. 

4.a)  I have only rarely bought literary journals but when I have I have been willing to pay quite a high price $20 is okay but I only purchase infreguently.

b)At this stage I would not be willing to pay $20 for a digital version of the same text, print is still preferable.

c) Print

5. The thing that would make me consider the digital over the print would be enhancements and bonus material, things like extra links, searchability, bookmarking tools and the quality of the visual material.  Price would also be a factor, I think it would have to be lower than the print edition.

I can see the advantages of e readers and I do imagine that I will eventually invest in one, not just continue with the iPad, but at the moment I still prefer print and suspect that digital versions may be a backup for my print resources which will remain my first choice. 

Goodluck with the survey, curious about the results.

Arabella @ http://genteelarsenal.blogspot.com.au/

***SURVEY***

1) Do you own an eBook Reader/Kindle/iPad? No

2a) In general, do you prefer reading print books or eBooks? Print books.

2b) If you prefer print, what do you find inconvenient about eBooks/eReaders? Technology constantly changing. I have boxes full of books-on-tape; try to find a new car today that has a tape player among all the gadgets that crowd the dashboard. Or try to buy a good, new, tape player that's not made in China.

3) Do you or have you read literary journals on your eBook Reader? No, I don't have an eBook Reader.

4a) How much would you pay for a PRINT literary journal that interested you (Literary journals generally cost between $10 to $20)? $10

4b) How much would you pay for an E-BOOK version of that same journal? I wouldn't buy one; however if I did 99 cents would be about right..

4c) If both print and eBook were the same price, which would you buy? Print

5) If you generally prefer PRINT versions, what changes would the eBook versions need to undergo in order to attract you (i.e. lower price, eBook-only enhancements, bonus materials, etc.)? Be less hard on the eyes, batteries last longer, give the readers away for free.

 

***END SURVEY***

 

 Brandon, I hope that my answers have been helpful. Check out our literary blog: http://OnagerEditions.blogspot.com/  It has been up for six years now. This spring we are bringing out a paperback with the best stories, essays, and poems from the previous years. We have also begun to publish novels, both in print and as ebooks. We recently published Stephen Poleskie's novel SCONTO WALA,  You can find this title on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Next month we will be bringing out a novel by the noted author Paul West called THE LEFT HAND IS THE DREAMER.

We are located in Ithaca; you were almost here when you came to Binghamton. There is a good article about Ithaca authors on the PLOUGHSHARES website. You can find a link to it on my Book Blogs page.

Best wishes, and good luck with your article,

Pearson

Thanks for the response and the info on Ithaca publishing/authors. I'll take a look at it.

1) Do you own an eBook Reader/Kindle/iPad?

Kindle cloud reader on pc, iPad, 2x kobo, all Adobe tools (can read/edit/create ebooks in any format)

2 a) In general, do you prefer reading print books or eBooks?

depends on context. references are usually better on paper for practical reasons.

2 b) If you prefer print, what do you find inconvenient about eBooks/eReaders?

for reference material, bookmarking and keeping pages open is easier. pdf and html are a close second to print bcs I have multiple screens so pdf or html references work well for some things.

3) Do you or have you read literary journals on your eBook Reader?

nope.

4 a) How much would you pay for a PRINT literary journal that interested you (Literary journals generally cost between $10 to $20)?

seldom read them. price is no object if I'm interested.

4 b) How much would you pay for an E-BOOK version of that same journal?

I would have to be truly desperate for the content to pay more than $10 for ANY ebook, but if I really craved or needed it, price wouldn't matter but if I felt overcharged I'd avoid the author/publisher in future

4 c) If both print and eBook were the same price, which would you buy?

neither. it would annoy me too much. (unless I already owned an earlier book in a series and wanted to read the rest, or it was something I needed for work, then it would still annoy me but I'd buy one or the other anyhow then hold a grudge)

5) If you generally prefer PRINT versions, what changes would the eBook versions need to undergo in order to attract you (i.e. lower price, eBook-only enhancements, bonus materials, etc.)?

lower price, hyperlinks to external content (like topic-specific, book-specific or author-specific web sites), multimedia content, coupons, no DRM, happy ending - basically an e-book that isn't fiction should take full advantage of the expanded capabilities of the digital medium, within the bounds of good sense and a justifiable business model

 

Dammit I wrote a long response and lost it due to the 15 minute editing time-limit. Piece of crap interface.

Let me explain. No, there's too much. Let me sum up.

The problem these journals are having is that they're still thinking of CONTENT as their product. It isn't.

CONTEXT is. Context equals eyeballs equals clicks equals leads equals customers. Content is still crucial, but in the digital paradigm it's a loss-leader. (LOL buzz-word bingo! I said paradigm!)

Sell the journals themselves for peanuts, then monetize them with affiliate programs and paid advertising. Advertisers today prefer digital options because they're track-able. I'd be very surprised if advertisers haven't already asked them "what about digital?"

"We have 30,000 circulation" means nothing beside "150k people viewed your ad, 1.7k clicked on it, 832 created accounts, and so far 42 of those bought your product".

A literary journal can sell books! Why are they worrying about charging their readers? The journal itself is one big ad!

They may not like to think of it in these terms, but what is a literary journal if not a gigantic advertisement for literature, a literature-related perspective, and the lifestyle and products that enable it? Sell leather bookmarks, throw pillows, tea, reading lamps, mugs, recliners, globes, reading and magnifying glasses, travel, cultural tchotchkes, shelving, slippers, snuggies, candles, cookies, anything and everything that people associate with books.

Sell "the book lifestyle" and "the reading experience" and "the philosophy of literature" by building a brand around these things that people can identify with and use to create or expand their own identities. 

Don't sell a lame-o literary journal for book nerds, sell a worldly, history-rich, full sensory experience that says "books" to the audience and associates it all with your name.

There's actually a Canadian Ad Agency by the same name, Stone Canoe Inc. focuses on digital marketing. Maybe they can help.

Hell, if these people are stuck on such basic questions as "what should we charge", maybe I can. :P

What I'd do is create relationships with appropriate affiliates, and use geography-specific markers like ip address to target advertising by country (indigo.ca and amazon.ca for canada, amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com for USA etc.).

I'd offer existing advertisers the digital option for free, but charge a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) or CPC (cost per click) rate for digital-only advertisers, which would make print advertising a more attractive deal for large advertisers, but still allow small players to purchase digitally. The CPC rate might make the most sense depending on the circulation, but a low cost per issue plus free access to the digital version with every print subscription would bump up the numbers quickly.

The tracking mechanisms already exist and could be installed using out-of-the-box software or even an open-source solution.

What would probably result is reduced print subscriptions (but not as much as they probably fear, since they're already a luxury/prestige item and people who buy for those reasons aren't going to abandon the print option) and a huge bump in digital readership as people who wouldn't shell out $20 for the print version gladly jump on the low-priced digital bandwagon, where a yearly subscription becomes an impulse buy for demographics who aren't currently reached by the print version. An initial online spend of a few thousand dollars of tightly targeted digital CPC ads (incl. a video) could have a huge ROI.

If that's all too scary, they could announce it as a 3-month trial and decide afterwards whether to continue it based on the results. Then take those results and figure out how to do it right.

Bah. I'm going back to bed.

Do some research and you'll see that what I'm talking about is good business sense, and the numbers are there to back it up.

By the way, if you run this by them, do it in a far more diplomatic way than I have.

I was annoyed when I wrote this and people seldom like hearing that they're behaving like fools. A message like this can take months or even years to deliver without giving offense and losing your audience. I'm pretty sure most on this site have already pigeon-holed me so I've spoken freely and off-the-cuff without regard for diplomacy.

If you seek to benefit from delivering this information, or to get a good grade, empirical data and diplomatic language are essential, as are putting enough into the relationship that you earn enough trust to be heard.

I can provide a bibliography and some links to back my assertions, if you'd like ;) just contact me via a private message.

Thanks for all your input. I agree that literary journals should take a page from the magazine playbook and include ads (whether they be in print or online). I may end up quoting you in the final paper if that's all right.

Fine by me! Include my blog address if you do ;)

(http://www.savagelullabye.com/)

A bit of background: I've been in the online industry since 1993, and have worked on contract for Fortune 500 Corporations. My "About" page on my blog has a bit more info. on all that.

1) Do you own an eBook Reader/Kindle/iPad? No

2a) In general, do you prefer reading print books or eBooks? Print

2b) If you prefer print, what do you find inconvenient about eBooks/eReaders? I can't write on the pages my thoughts or questions

3) Do you or have you read literary journals on your eBook Reader? No

4a) How much would you pay for a PRINT literary journal that interested you (Literary journals generally cost between $10 to $20)? 20+

4b) How much would you pay for an E-BOOK version of that same journal? 0

4c) If both print and eBook were the same price, which would you buy? Print

5) If you generally prefer PRINT versions, what changes would the eBook versions need to undergo in order to attract you (i.e. lower price, eBook-only enhancements, bonus materials, etc.)? I would need to be able to write on the pages.

 

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